Interesting unknown Earthquake Facts

Interesting unknown Earthquake Facts

  1. Natural events such as volcanic eruptions and meteor impacts can cause earthquakes, but the majority of naturally-occurring earthquakes are triggered by movement of the earth's plates.
  2. The largest recorded earthquake in the United States was a magnitude 9.2 that struck Prince William Sound, Alaska on March 28, 1964.
  3. Almost 80% of all the planet's earthquakes occur along the rim of the Pacific Ocean, called the "Ring of Fire"; a region that encircles the Pacific Ocean and is home to 452 volcanoes.
  4. The earth's surface consists of 20 constantly moving plates. The pressure increase from shifting plates can cause the crust to break. This break allows stress to be released as energy, which moves through the earth in the form of waves.
  5. Before the Indonesian earthquake and tsunami in 2004, witnesses reported seeing animals and birds heading for the higher ground. Scientists think that animals may sense weak tremors before a quake, or possibly electrical signals triggered by the shifting of underground rocks.
  6. The National Earthquake Information Centre (NEIC) files an average of 20,000 earthquakes every year around the world.
  7. Alaska has the most number of earthquakes and is one of the most active regions in the world with magnitudes of 7.2 on an average every year.
  8. City in Chile moved about 10 feet as a result of the enormous 8.8 magnitude earthquake February 27, 2010. This cleave in Earth's crust shifted the city of Concepcin. This particular earthquake is also thought to have changed the planet's rotation slightly and shortened the duration of a day.
  9. Haiti: Jan. 12, 2010; 7-magnitude; 316,000 people killed.
  10. Pakistan: Oct. 8, 2005; 7.6-magnitude; 80,361 people killed.
  11. Tangshan, China: July 27, 1976; 7.5-magnitude; 255,000 people killed.
  12. Eastern Sichuan, China: May 12, 2008; 7.9-magnitude; 87,587 people killed.
  13. Sumatra, Indonesia: Dec. 26, 2004; 9.1-magnitude; 227,898 people killed.
  14. Most earthquakes in Canada are relatively small, but in the last 100 years, there have been at least nine earthquakes with a magnitude greater than 7. In a dense urban area, a strong quake could cause immense destruction. 
  15. Scientists developed the theory of plate tectonics in the mid-twentieth century.
  16. The 9.0 earthquake that struck Japan March 11, 2011 was the worst earthquake in Japan’s history. It created a tsunami with waves as high as 30 feet (10 meters) and severely damaged nuclear power plants.
  17. The devastating 2011 earthquake in Japan created a massive 186-mile long and 93 mile wide rift 15 miles under the ocean.
  18. Nearly 2,000 years ago, a Chinese astronomer named Zhang Heng (A.D. 78-139) invented the world’s first earthquake detector. It could detect earthquakes more than 370 miles (600 km) away.
  19. In Japan mythology, a giant catfish called Namazu is responsible for earthquakes.
  20. There are about 500,000 earthquakes a year around the world, as detected by sensitive instruments. About 100,000 of those can be felt, and 100 or so cause damage each year. Each year the southern California area alone experiences about 10,000 earthquakes, most of them not felt by people.





 

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